BERNIE SANDERS
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Customer Connect

Customer Connect: Letter carriers use Customer Connect to take advantage of their special relationship with businesses, encouraging business patrons to ship with the U.S. Postal Service instead of with a private delivery service. To date, carriers have generated more than $1.9 billion in new annual revenue for USPS since Customer Connect was started in mid-2003. Click here to find out more.

Thanks for your help and support

 

 

 

Food Drive Donation Link - http://vad.aidmatrix.org/vadxml.cfm?driveid=39184

 

 

Protesters take “Save Post Office” demo to San Francisco

Campaigners hoping to halt the sale of the downtown Berkeley Post Office took their protest to San Francisco on Dec. 4. Photo: Harvey Smith

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Campaigners display a banner at their Dec. 4 protest in San Francisco. Photo: Harvey Smith

 

The USPS has put 40 historical post offices up for sale in the last few years in numerous communities around the country. The sell-off of such a large number of historic properties so alarmed the National Trust for Historic Preservation that in June it put historic post offices on its “2012 List of America’s 11 Most Endangered Places.” Despite the efforts of numerous activists in communities around the country, the USPS has never backed off from closing a historic post office after its closure was announced.

Before it can take any action, the USPS is required to hold a formally noticed public meeting to discuss its proposal, after which it will take written testimony for 15 days.

 

 

Postal Employees’ Relief Fund (PERF)

Taking care of our postal family

Sometimes letter carriers are a beacon of hope to people brought to their knees by a natural disaster, bringing vital supplies or documents—and a reminder that life will be normal again—to customers hit by a storm, flood or fire.

But postal workers can also be victims.

Click here to download a grant application form from the PERF website.

To look out for our postal family, the NALC supports the Postal Employees’ Relief Fund (PERF).

Since 1990, PERF has been there to help carriers, clerks and other active and retired postal workers rebuild after hurricanes, typhoons, earthquakes, floods, tornadoes and wildfires.

PERF Hands logo
CFC #10268

Initially created to assist postal employees affected by Hurricane Hugo and the San Francisco Bay-area earthquake, the fund has gone on to provide thousands grants totaling millions of dollars since it began.

PERF will continue to be there for postal workers with simple structure for determining eligibility and grant amounts.

In 2013, the PERF executive committee adopted this structure to speed and simplify the aid process and assure that every postal worker in need of PERF assistance would have access to its help as big disasters put increasing demands on its resources.

Applicants do not need to wait until after they receive insurance settlements or other emergency relief to apply for help from PERF, though they still must provide documentation of the loss.

The application must come to PERF no later than 120 days after the disaster, except under extenuating circumstances.

Buy a book, support PERF

Carried Away!

Carried Away! True Stories from Letter Carriers Across America is a collection put together by Kate Drury of Massachusetts Northeast Merged Branch 25, and Lois McNulty a former letter carrier and Branch 25 member. Book proceeds benefit PERF.

Click here to visit the Carried Away! website.

To qualify for assistance, the applicant’s home must have been destroyed  or damaged to the point of being uninhabitable for a long period (an estimated 90 days or more).

Homeowners whose residences are destroyed are eligible for a grant of $3,000; homeowners or renters displaced by severe damage, but who will eventually return to their old homes, can receive $2,000.

Non-career and retired employees in either situation are eligible for half these amounts.

In addition to floods or storms, loss of a home in a fire is included, but only when caused by a natural disaster—for instance, a home lost to lightning or wildfire could qualify; a fire caused by an electrical short or stray cigarette would not.

These changes apply to natural disasters occurring on or after Oct. 29, 2012, which includes Hurricane Sandy.

“The PERF Executive Committee went through a tough process to make these changes,” said NALC President Fredric Rolando, who is one of the grantors for PERF. “The process now reflects a new reality—more and more postal employees are affected by natural disasters, and it’s becoming harder to keep up with their needs. That makes your donation at this critical time even more important.”

You can mail a check to PERF at P.O. Box 7630, Woodbridge, VA 22195, or donate by credit card online at its website.

You also can give to PERF through the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC); the CFC number for PERF is 10268. Contributions to PERF are tax-deductible for federal income tax purposes.

If you need help from PERF, visit its website, postalrelief.com, for eligibility and application information, call 202-408-1869 or send an e-mail to perf10268@aol.com.

 

Unions send letter to leaders of House committee with USPS oversight

April 14, 2014—The presidents of the four postal employee unions—NALC, APWU, NRLCA and NPMHU—wrote a letter to House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R-CA) and Ranking Member Elijah Cummings (D-MD) to share the unions’ views on President Obama’s budget proposals for 2015:

We strongly oppose major elements of the [Obama] administration’s proposed reforms as outdated and counterproductive to the goal of strengthening the Postal Service for the 21st century. The USPS has strongly recovered over the past 18 months as the economy has bounced back and the e-commerce boom has gathered pace. In the absence of the prefunding burden, the Service was profitable in 2013…

Both [Issa’s] H.R. 2748 and the president’s plans were devised at the height of the global financial crisis and proceed from the false premise that the Internet is destroying the Postal Service. But it’s not 2009 anymore…

Rather than slashing services in a way that will drive business away, it’s time for sensible, targeted reforms that will free the Postal Service to innovate and grow. These reforms should include a permanent fix to the pre‐funding burden as suggested above, the fair calculation of postal pension surpluses, suitable pricing reforms and new freedom to offer services through our existing networks to meet unmet public needs. These reforms would allow the Postal Service to do what our founding fathers intended when they established the Post Office in our Constitution: To bind the nation together and to adapt to meet the evolving needs of America’s citizens and businesses….

Click here to read the letter.

The Postal Service has a survey on ending Saturday delivery: So do we


February 15, 2013

The Postal Service has just released the results of a survey it commissioned on its plan to end Saturday delivery.  The Postal Service press release says the survey shows that 80 percent of Americans support the new delivery schedule. 

Before you take that conclusion very seriously, there are a few things you should know about the new survey

First, the survey was “fielded online.”  That means that the people who most depend on the Postal Service and Saturday delivery — those who aren’t online all the time, like seniors and people in rural areas without good broadband — were excluded from participating in the survey.

Second, the Postal Service says that the survey used “a blended sample of panel and non-panel.”  That means some of the people surveyed were recruited to participate.  The Postal Service doesn’t provide any information about how the recruitment was done or who was selected to participate or what portion of the thousand people surveyed was pre-selected.  One can only imagine how the selection process might have skewed the results.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, the survey includes questions that are framed in ways that inevitably affect how people responded.  The first question on the survey, for example, is: “Before today, do you recall hearing anything about the financial losses that the Postal Service experienced last year, of approximately $15.9 billion?”

The survey thus begins by presenting the participants with a huge deficit number, which undoubtedly inclines the average person to favor cost-cutting measures like ending Saturday delivery. 

Subsequent questions on the survey are even more likely to bias the results.  One question says: “After learning that this change will ensure that the Postal Service does not experience an interruption in service, to what extent do you support the decision of the Postal Service to begin delivering mail five days per week and packages six days per week, including continuing package delivery on Saturdays?”

Another question says: “After learning that this change will ensure that the Postal Service does NOT have to raise the prices of mail service or package delivery in the near future, to what extent do you support the decision of the Postal Service to begin delivering mail five days per week?”

The next question says: “After learning that this change will ensure that the Postal Service does NOT become a burden on U.S. taxpayers, to what extent do you support the decision of the Postal Service to begin delivering mail five days per week?"

The Postal Service thus basically tells survey participants, "If we don’t end Saturday delivery, we may need to raise postage raises, or we might have to look for a bailout from the taxpayer, or we may not be able to deliver the mail at all."  These are obviously scare tactics designed to elicit the responses the Postal Service wants from the survey.  They are not unbiased questions intended to get useful survey results.

The survey was conducted by IPSOS, a global market research company headquartered in Paris.  The survey describes IPSOS as “a leading independent, publicly-listed market research company.”  The survey is so patently biased, one has to wonder how IPSOS could have agreed to conduct it.

Perhaps it would be useful if the Postal Service conducted another survey that provided some actual facts about the context for its plan to end Saturday delivery — something that explains the causes for the deficit, the problems with the plan, and so on.  Since the Postal Service is unlikely to commission such a study, Save the Post Office is conducting its own.

Like the IPSOS survey, ours is online, so the results are skewed toward Internet users, but we've tried to set up the questions in a more informative and objective way than the Postal Service did.

If you have a moment, please take the survey, and then click on the link to see the results so far.  We'll be sure to share them with the Postal Service.

If you want to share the survey, email a link to this page (here) or go directly to the survey on Google docs here and forward that.  (If the survey isn't appearing below, try refreshing your browser.)

 

 

 

Default not committed by the Postal Service, but by
Congress:
The word “default” sounds ominous, but in reality this is a
default on the part of Congress. It was Congress that in 2006 imposed a burden
on the Postal Service that no other public agency or private company in America
faces—the obligation to pre-fund future retiree health benefits. And Congress
made this unaffordable by requiring the Postal Service, which doesn’t receive a
dime of taxpayer money, to pre-fund 75 years into the future.
Click here to read NALC President
Fredric Rolando's statement.

Click here to read the truth about Postal Service
finances.